NetVibes Digital Life Aggregator

So I discovered NetVibes today. Ok so I didn’t so much discover (as in Christopher Columbus) it, because I’ve known about NetVibes for some time now, but I made the switch from IGoogle(and Google reader) as my DLA/homepage over to NetVibes. NetVibes is a free Digital Life Aggregator, that allows you to organize your entire online life( for the most part) into tabbed pages. Everything from email to blogs to comics and games. Why, might you ask, would such an avid supporter of the googleverse make such a fundamental digital-life change? Well for what I have lost in one click access to all my various google accounts/apps and tools I have gained in recouped time and ease of use. So here are some of the things that made me switch:

Thing number 1: Visual appeal

The flexible layout ie. 2/3/4 column options make visually much easier to canvas all your feeds in a manner that saves time and space. It truly allows you to get all you information at a glance. Plus there’re just more things that can be optimized to better your experience.

Thing number 2: It’s like Google reader and Igoogle smashed into one app.

Netvibes’ layout and navigation is more like igoogle (on steroids), but the functionality and depth of information is more like google reader. Most widgets display up to the last 25 posts from an rss fee, whereas igoogle only allows you a measly 9.

Thing number 3: Sharing stuff

Incidentally, that’s how I first leart of NetVibes, through an invite which included the invitor’s setup for a particular tab. Yes, I was able to, with one click, start using a presetup netvibes page inclusive of cool widgets and feeds already setup by my friend who invited me to test it out. By the way, here’s a link to try net vibes out: http://www.netvibes.com/subscribe.php?preconfig=126efb5c739f8468139e69206b4fe46d

Thing number 4: It’s portable

If one day I decide NetVibes isn’t for me anymore, I can pack up my digital belongings via OPML and move on the the next DLA. Google has been touting the coming of this feature for a long time, but I am yet to see it. Incidentally, had they already done this, it would have made the switch to NetVibes a lot less time consuming.

Thing number 5: Netvibes supports igoogle widgets!

At least so they claim, and we all know how “support” for a 3rd party format can be. Up until writing this posted, I hadn’t tested the feature, but it does exist.

Thing number 6: They’re going social with Netvibes Ginger.

Yes, now it will be a whole lot easier with NetVibes Ginger (now in testing) to share all this wonderful “Funtastimation” that you’ve amassed in all new ways.

So why doesn’t Google just make one even more killer app like Netvibes?

My guess is: 1. They’re working on it and/or 2. The same internal structure which has led to Google’s great success where people take ownership of projects that are their own ideas can sometimes lead to political/bureaucratic slowdowns when it comes time for the company to change direction, shutdown, or merge projects especially if those project leaders have become more influential in the company . and/or 3. We’re so big and have so many things going on right now that this is the least of our issues. Plus, what is a “netvibe” anyways? Who knows. My point is, give Netvibes a chance, you might just like it.

Rf.

Advertisements

Top 100 Organically Ranked Domains

Well, once more, being the curious loveable lover of long lists that I was lead in search of the top performing websites in search engines. Well, after searching vigorouusly, I found that very data, presented using a great customizable webscraper called Velocityscape. Velocitscape appears to have a suite of powerful data gathering tools. Definitely worth the download of the demos at least. Spyfu, for example – an Alexa style web data repository – is powered by Velocityscape macros. I will strive to keep this data updated and repost it every now and then.

Rank Domain Total Organic Results

1 yahoo.com 1549769

2 ebay.com 1519410

3 amazon.com 1467135

4 wikipedia.org 1215115

5 about.com 738624

6 blogspot.com 728314

7 craigslist.org 711328

8 google.com 696807

9 findarticles.com 596109

10 answers.com 546739

11 bizrate.com 466304

12 shopping.com 462951

13 msn.com 434465

14 epinions.com 432106

15 microsoft.com 407068

16 amazon.co.uk 375818

17 nextag.com 336002

18 dealtime.com 303313

19 aol.com 299166

20 nih.gov 298090

21 youtube.com 280754

22 cnet.com 273855

23 imdb.com 259333

24 pricegrabber.com 257717

25 myspace.com 230585

26 mysimon.com 207543

27 nytimes.com 199216

28 geocities.com 197176

29 bbc.co.uk 192336

30 howstuffworks.com 178672

31 citysearch.com 175972

32 wordpress.com 174319

33 techrepublic.com.com 171745

34 freepatentsonline.com 165903

35 webshots.com 164529

36 ebay.co.uk 153907

37 alibaba.com 149448

38 ezinearticles.com 148469

39 ciao.co.uk 145855

40 jstor.org 145088

41 springerlink.com 141290

42 gc.ca 136163

43 thefreedictionary.com 134824

44 hp.com 132846

45 typepad.com 129271

46 ingentaconnect.com 129202

47 ibm.com 129081

48 tripod.com 126243

49 sun.com 126182

50 ecnext.com 126127

51 dmoz.org 124947

52 business.com 123069

53 tripadvisor.com 121692

54 eurekster.com 117020

55 patentstorm.us 116787

56 topix.net 116694

57 ieee.org 114765

58 elsevier.com 114098

59 cduniverse.com 114064

60 amazon.ca 113650

61 ign.com 113454

62 softpedia.com 111212

63 flickr.com 110112

64 careerbuilder.com 110050

65 squidoo.com 108716

66 harvard.edu 106433

67 sourceforge.net 105462

68 cnn.com 103743

69 spyfu.com 103389

70 go.com 102925

71 superpages.com 102675

72 blackwell-synergy.com 101140

73 mit.edu 98210

74 qarchive.org 96697

75 netscape.com 95423

76 ca.gov 94173

77 stanford.edu 92956

78 ebay.ca 92815

79 apple.com 89621

80 apache.org 88423

81 allexperts.com 88333

82 zdnet.com 85424

83 berkeley.edu 84356

84 freedownloadscenter.com 84299

85 oxfordjournals.org 83961

86 ed.gov 82396

87 angelfire.com 80485

88 rhapsody.com 80417

89 britannica.com 79801

90 sortprice.com 76734

91 bizjournals.com 76642

92 nasa.gov 75681

93 usatoday.com 74114

94 inist.fr 73984

95 findlaw.com 72954

96 washingtonpost.com 72928

97 city-data.com 72896

98 associatedcontent.com 72867

99 barnesandnoble.com 72670

100 psu.edu 71307

Last updated 9/1/07. Data is based upon 370,681,167 search results on 1,891,375 keywords across 7,513,090 domains. This data is for entertainment purposes only. I am not responsible for the accuracy of this data.

Do as I say. Not as I sell!

” Ask questions from your heart and you will be answered from the heart.”
– Omaha Proverb

paidlinks1.jpg

This just never ceases to amaze me whenever it comes up in conversation – as it did again at this year’s SES San Jose.

Memoirs from SES San Jose 2007: Swag review – The Good, The Bad and What The?!!

SES San Jose 2007
So SES San Jose 2007 is over and done with and it was in one word…Awesome! It was my second SES but my first in San Jose. The experience at San Jose’s Search Engine Strategies is an incredible one. The intangible yet palpable cloud of knowledge and industry insight was extraordinary. Whether it came from industry leaders or my SEM peers, information and answers were always on tap. Just knowing that I was getting the best, most efficient strategies in the industry direct from the horse’s mouth as well as the most intelligible guesses as to the future of search engine marketing made the pricey conference fee well worth it. Or, maybe I was just star-struck, at least as star-stuck as one can get in the search industry. I mean, I met Marissa Mayer from Google, I made Matt Cutts chuckle and I got to a chance to one-on-one about link baiting with Rand Fishkin from SEOMoz…all totally awesome!

But enough about the people, great sessions and info at SES San Jose, my more detailed summaries will come in later blogs. Right now I am talking about those unsung heroes of conferences like SES, the foot soldiers of brand equity: Chochkies…a.k.a. leave behinds a.k.a. promotional products, premiums etc. etc. Though we oft take these small stars of the business world for granted, sometimes these knickknacks drive entire industries…for example the pharmaceutical industry spends several millions per year to produce effective leave behinds that keep their drugs top of mind for doctors, especially prior to the availability to them of the mainstream media. So in honor of the creative minds who used their brain juice to work extra hard for brands… here is my review of the chochkies from the exhibitors at SES San Jose 2007.

T-Shirt review.
There was an abundance of T-shirts. T-shirts are always a great. Everyone uses them and of course they’re awesome for branding – think Nike, Versace, Fubu etc. My favorite was, of course, the Google Dance shirt. The creative (artwork) was good…it was in association with an event (great branding and relevance)…and frankly it was cool looking, and will be doubly so once I get back to MCO. Other T-shirts worth mentioning came from LinkWorth – one of the only booths that you HAD to give them your contact info (via badge scan) to get one – hey, if your paying good money for your promotional items…turn them into lead generators. GenieKnowsGames.com also gave away T-shirts at their mondo display complete with freeplay video games. My T-shirt lust also led me to discover Moniker.com, a forward thinking Domain Asset Management company…I like forward thinking companies – heck! I like the words “forward thinking”.

tshirts from SES San Jose 2007

What the ??!!
The What the Heck award goes to Findology‘s little Findology watch-a-ma-call-it (molecule). I have no idea what it does…but it’s cool looking when arranged in a line on their exhibit table. The downside of this marketing piece is that you don’t do anything with it so after a few days of looking at it, mine will probably eventually find the trash. I guess Findology is a science best understood by those who practice it (ha I kill me!)

findology.jpg

Water bottles.

Ah water bottles, colorful, plentiful and mostly boring. But we can always use more. Water bottles offer lots of real estate for brand and tend to be something that people keep around and reuse, so though not the sexiest of chochkies…they can provide good bang for buck. I did get one cool one though on a private tour of Google (but that’s another blog entry :).

water11.jpgwater3.jpgwater2.jpg

That’s cool.
I haven’t had so much fun with two magnets since elementary school. ABC search‘s noisy, disruptive spinning magnet things were fantastic…I even almost got put out of a session before it started just because they could possibly be potentially disruptive..lol! Oh yeah! Also, I loved Hakia‘s totally novel “Search Music”. It was music composed and performed by members of staff at the search engine. They all seemed very proud of this piece at the booth…and rightfully so…I could easily see this charting well on Billboard’s ethno-techie-world-ambience genre!

abcsearch2.jpg hakia.jpg

Best of Show.
A lesson in relevance, and relevance really is what search is all about. Superpages.com a business directory and local search engine owned by Idearc Media Corp. out of Dallas, Texas. So for Search Engine Strategies San Jose 2007, they gave away a very comprehensive Survival Kit and guide to the city of San Jose. Kudos to the Superpages.com marketing team and forward-thinking executives who approved what I’m sure was a fairly costly and well branded leave behind piece. It included an offline paper version of their mapping technology (it’s great…you have to see it), hand sanitizers, key rings, a flashlight and other small useful items plus a (complete) 2007 Zagat survey. For their great effort and execution, they get from me a keyword rich backlink: yellow pages maps directions.

superpages1.jpgmap.jpgzagat.jpg

Others worth mentioning…

The light up bouncyball from ClickPath. My 2-year-old daughter has already gleaned hours of fun from this gadget.

clickpath.jpg

MP3 Player speakers from Island Data. I just wish there was more about their brand included on this piece – like a tag line &/or website.
islanddata.jpg

A USB jump drive I got from Google (on my tour of the campus).
jump.jpg

The moral of today’s story?
1. The best leave behinds are those that are most relevant to the event and to your audience!
2. Not all link baiting needs be online…as a matter of fact, if you want a link back to your website, send me your best chochky, T-shirt or whatever and I will review it and give you a backlink to your site.
mailto: Ryan Weidman, 7450 Sandlake Commons Blvd., Orlando, FL 32819.