How to ride a dead horse

From an email recently sent to me:

The tribal wisdom of the Dakota Indians, passed on from generation to generation, says that, “When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.” However, in government, education, and in corporate America, more advanced strategies are often employed, such as:
1. Buying a stronger whip.

2. Changing riders.

3. Appointing a committee to study the dead horse.

4. Arranging to visit other countries to see how other cultures ride dead horses.

5. Lowering the standards so that dead horses can be included.

6. Reclassifying the dead horse as living-impaired.

7. Hiring outside contractors to ride the dead horse.

8. Harnessing several dead horses together to increase speed.

9. Providing additional funding and/or training to increase the dead horse’s performance.

10. Doing a productivity study to see if lighter riders would improve the dead horse’s performance.

11. Declaring that as the dead horse – does not have to be fed, – it is less costly, – carries lower overhead and – therefore contributes substantially more to the bottom line of the economy than do some other horses.

12. Rewriting the expected performance requirements for all horses. And of course the favorite…. and most prevalent…

13. Promoting the dead horse to a supervisory position

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Car Logo Ripoffs from Around the World.

The Chinese have long been known for their ability to duplicate products and technologies in record time and bring them to market faster and more cheaply than any established manufacturer could ever dream. But whereas we may only see the Chinese as the great product knock-off  artists that they are, we often overlook other countries’ abilities when it comes to the fine art of the R&D (Rip-off & Duplicate) as is demonstrated by these fine car logo creations from around the world (but mostly China).

car rip off 1

BMW (Bavaria) vs.  BYD (China).

car rip off 2
Lamborghini (Italy) vs. Arash (UK)

car rip off 3
Mazda (Japan) vs. Haima (China)

car rip off 4
Aston Martin (England) vs. Hyundai Genesis (Korea)

car rip off 5
Toyota (Japan) vs. Changan(China)

car rip off 6
Toyota (Japan) vs. Jincheng, (China)

car rip off 7
Toyota(Japan) vs. Xiali (China)

car rip off 8
Toyota (Japan) vs. Merry (China)

car rip off 9
Infinity (Japan) vs. Chery (China)

car rip off 10
Infinity (Japan) vs. Suzhou (China)

car rip off 11
Infinity (Japan) vs.  Huaxiang (China)

car rip off 12
Mercedes (Germany) vs.  BAW (China)

car rip off 13
Oldsmobile (USA) vs. Mahindra (India)

car rip off 14
Oldsmobile (USA) vs. First Auto Works (China)

car rip off 15
Subaru (Japan) vs. Jiangnan, (China)

car rip off 16
Pegaso (Spain) vs. Carlsson (Germany)

car rip off 17
Jeep vs. Geep (The Philippines)

Someone, anyone…please explain this sign.

I am thoroughly befuddled and rather disturbed by this sign in a public park.

confusing sign

What is email?

Stumbled across this funny ad from 1977. It is a visual illustration of email.

“Ah the good ol’ days…… When you could smoke at your desk (notice the ashtray) and receive “Electronic Mail” without a computer at your desk…”
– comment on Digg.com

email.jpg

The text says,

Electronic Mail is a term that’s been bandied about data processing circles for years.
Simply out, it means high-speed information transportation. One of the most advanced methods is terminals talking to one another.
Your mailbox is the terminal on your desk. Punch a key and today’s correspondence and messages are displayed instantly.
Need to notify people immediately of a fast-breaking development? Have your messages delivered to their terminal mailboxes electronically, across the hall or around the world.
Electronic Mail is document distribution that’s more timely, accurate and flexible than traditional methods.
There’s no mountain of paperwork.
Administrative personnel are more effective.
Managers have access to more up-to-date information. Decision-making is easier.
Tomorrow’s automated office will clearly include Electronic Mail. But like the rest of the Office of the Future, it’s available at Honeywell today.
For more information, call Laurie Reeves at (800)225-3222/3 (within the 617 area, call 552-2048). Or write him at Honeywell Office Automation Systems, Three Newton Executive Park Drive, Newton Lower falls, Massachusetts 02162.
Honeywell.